INTUIT: Interaction Design for Trusted Sharing of Personal Health Data to Live well with HIV

Prof. Lynne Coventry and Dr Liz Sillence

This EPSRC funded project seeks to identify and address fundamental Trust, Identity, Privacy and Security (TIPS) challenges faced by those managing stigmatised long term conditions including HIV in managing their health and interacting with care services, peer support networks, and private organisations. We will develop new tools providing people with opportunity and choice for managing the trusted sharing of their self-generated data with others. We will envision innovative service propositions that are grounded in a new empirical understanding of challenging but highly relevant contexts for sharing these data. INTUIT brings together experts in HIV Medicine, Public Health, Human Computer Interaction, Design, Health Psychology, Health Informatics and Applied Ethics with colleagues in Design at Northumbria but also Bristol University, City University, Edinburgh and UCL.

@INTUIT_project

Going Online for Health: Noting Changes Over Time

As part of an ongoing project PactLab researchers have used survey methodology to take a snapshot of e-health users every five years since the year 2000 in order to assess changing patterns of use and engagement with online health information and advice. A large scale questionnaire has allowed us to note changes in website use and to model the factors that predict trust in online health advice across a range of different user groups.

Trust, Risk and Identity Issues Online

This research examined how and why people choose to trust online health advice and to act upon website recommendations. There is a focus on users with real health concerns e.g. HRT/menopause, High Blood Pressure and Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR). The research utilised a variety of data collection techniques including focus groups, interviews, data logging, diaries, questionnaires and experimental work.

NIHR

The value of patient choice, self care, and patient and public involvement has been increasingly noted in the health sector. These aims cannot be achieved unless people can access high quality health information. Traditionally, health information has been based on facts and figures of the illness, and very few of them contained information on patient’s experiences (PEx). It is argued that people seek more than scientific facts. They want to know more about how other people with the same condition have experienced, and be able to share their own experience with others. Knowing other people’s experience has the potential to affect decision making, reduce one sense of isolation, and improve adjustment to the disease. At the same time, there are also concerns that PEx might have a negative effect of an individual if the experience of others contains strong emotional content, or is not directly relevant. This project will examine how people use, search for, and select PEx in online health sites or online support groups, and how exposure to PEx might influence recall and health decisions. Understanding how people use PEx online might have important implications for health care professionals on whether, when, and how they should incorporate PEx into online health information sites or online support groups.

For more information go to http://www.ipexonline.org/

Increasing Acceptance of Online Health Information

This project is aimed at parents with low SES (socio-economic status).  A mixed method approach has been used to develop a tailored online health intervention. Using psychological techniques in this case Self Affirmation theory, the project aims to increase the acceptance of a health message and lead to a change in behaviour.  The overall goal is to increase fruit and vegetable consumption, amongst participants, over the course of a week.

Going online for health: Noting changes over time

As part of an ongoing project PactLab researchers have used survey methodology to take a snapshot of e-health users every five years since the year 2000 in order to assess changing patterns of use and engagement with online health information and advice. A large scale questionnaire has allowed us to note changes in website use and to model the factors that predict trust in online health advice across a range of different user groups.

Online narratives and HIV risk perceptions

Starting in May 2016, Pactlab are involved with colleagues in Hong Kong examining the efficacy of using online narratives in changing HIV risk perceptions and behaviors among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong